Past Sessions

Classroom Response Systems: A Critical Review of Top Hat, Learning Catalytics, iClickers, Kahoot, and Google Forms – August 21, 2017

The use of Classroom Response Systems (CRS) has been shown to promote student engagement in class and the attainment of course learning outcomes. CRS are used to promote learning by prompting all students to answer the professor’s questions, to gauge their understanding, get real-time feedback on their answers, and to stimulate discussion. With multiple CRS available in the Faculty of Arts, instructors who wish to use one for the first time, or are considering alternatives, may benefit from receiving feedback from a colleague who has used many of them and knows their strengths and weaknesses.

Andrew Owen from the Department of Political Science will be presenting a critical review of various systems, covering both pedagogy and logistics.

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Key Speakers

Dr. Andrew Owen
Assistant Professor
Department of Political Science

Facilitating reflection on student presentations: Using CLAS to promote critical self-reflection and online peer-review – May 8, 2017

Bill Gates’ 2013 TED talk suggestion that teachers need “real feedback” in the form of video recordings of their work points to the potential pedagogical value of seeing oneself present in front of a class. In this workshop, I will introduce a new, home-grown UBC tool – CLAS – designed to facilitate commentary on video-recordings, which I have used to enable students to see their own in-class presentations and give feedback to one another about those presentations. I will describe some of the affordances of CLAS and report both my own and students’ experiences using the program.

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Key Speaker

katepower
Dr. Kate Power
Instructor
Department of Arts Studies in Research and Writing

 


Facilitating online peer review: Using STUDIORUM to promote student engagement – May 8, 2017

Research has shown a generally positive relationship between the use of learning technologies and student engagement. In this workshop, I will share my experiences with a new, home-grown UBC WordPress product – STUDIORUM – which was designed to promote and facilitate student engagement in peer review. In this workshop, I will describe how I have used STUDIORUM in two courses: a first-year required writing course and a third-year English course. I will also outline what I consider to be the strengths and challenges of STUDIORUM for both peer review and providing feedback on students’ work, and report my students’ feedback on working with the product.

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Key Speaker

 


Using ePortfolios in your Course – April 26, 2017

This workshop will provide practical information about how to integrate an ePortfolio into course requirements to support learning goals and enable students to begin to curate a collection of their accomplishments, including examples of academic work. By developing their ePortfolio, students can create connections across courses and disciplines, and bring their experiences outside of the classroom in conversation with their academic work. The ePortfolio is also a career development tool, as it provides students with a platform to showcase their learning, skills, and achievements. Learn more about the pedagogical value of ePortfolios in the first hour of the workshop; the second hour will consist of hands-on activities. Please bring a syllabus to get started with integrating an ePortfolio into your course learning objectives.

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Key Speaker

Christine D'OnofrioDr. Christine D’Onofrio
Instructor
Department of Art History, Visual Art & Theory

Michael GriffinDr. Michael Griffin
Associate Professor
Department of Philosophy